Big change on the Colville Reservation

In eastern Washington, the Colville Confederated Tribes are facing the same problems the world faces: the increasing difficulty of sustaining ways of life on a deteriorating resource base, and the resulting conflict. In response, the Colvilles are changing something so fundamental that most of us aren't aware of it. They are changing the way they make decisions.

Beyond conflict to consensus: an introductory learning manual

If you have the desire or the intent to confront and resolve conflict, this manual can help teach you the skills. Every technique or question in here has purpose. In trying to understand the purpose, you will better understand conflict in human nature.

The talking circle is the centerpiece of the consensus process because it encourages respectful listening. If you can only adopt one thing from this manual, adopt the talking circle.

Who will take care of the land? Challis team begins to design a future for their community

from Patterns of Choice, 1998

CUSTER COUNTY, IDAHO--Two years ago, rancher Ted O'Neil said he felt "goddam bleak" about his future. In a recent meeting he said, "You know what I feel about today? I wouldn't go back to the old way even if we didn't have to do this."

Change and loss

Change is constant. Like death and taxes, it is inevitable. It is a paradox that must be faced and accepted if we are to be prepared for it emotionally and practically -- if we are to live fully and grow.

Changes are endings and beginnings -- a time when the body responds both physically and emotionally to the process of separation from the old, the certain, the comfortable, and the entry into the new, the unknown, and the feared.

If we have time to react, a person responds to changes in these stages:

Institution or association? A basic choice for community efforts

A basic choice
for the organization of community efforts

Institution--Strategic Association--Responsive
Board of Directors hires an Executive Director Ad hoc committee hires a facilitator
leadership is mostly top down leadership is bottom up
centered on programs and tasks; the people part is usually an abstraction

Exploring conflict: the process

by Bob Chadwick, Consensus Associates

PO Box 235 Terrebonne, OR 97760 (541) 548-7112

WORKSHOPS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

EXPLORING CONFLICT - THE BASIC PROCESS

LEARNING MANUAL 1

Spokane, WA

September 24-27, 2002

Prepared By:

CONSENSUS ASSOCIATES

PO Box 235

Terrebonne, OR 97760

(503) 548-7112




WORKSHOPS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

Exploring conflict and unresolved conflict

The participants were redistributed into six new groups, each exploring the concept of conflict. Half the groups explored the definition of conflict and how they felt about it, and the other half exploring the evidence that unresolved conflict exists in their environment.

This activity redistributes the participants into new relationships. It is often based on concerns raised by participants during the grounding.

Consensus learning manual, part 3: the process

THE QUESTIONS:

1. THE GROUNDING:


* "INTRODUCE YOURSELF AND YOUR RELATIONSHIP TO EDUCATION."

* "WHAT ARE YOUR EXPECTATIONS OF THIS INSTITUTE?"

* "TELL US HOW YOU FEEL ABOUT BEING HERE"

INSIGHT ON GROUNDING (Page 23)


2. THE GREETING CIRCLE:


3. AN ADAPTIVE LEARNING PROCESS


* HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT IT?

Low stress livestock handling, part 1

(From Patterns of Choice, 1990s) We are pleased to announce a regular feature on low-stress livestock handling contributed by Steve Cote (two syllables, long e). Steve is the NRCS district conservationist for Arco, Idaho, and has devoted considerable time to learning and testing livestock handling methods and approaches that work, and has paid special attention to the methods taught by Bud Williams. What follows is Steve's interpretation and understanding of these methods.

Low stress livestock handling, part 2

We should start training our livestock by getting them to respond calmly and consistently to three cues:

  1. Responding to pressure from a handler approach that is nearly perpendicular to the sides of the animal
  2. Responding to pressure from a handler approach that is coming more from the rear
  3. Going by or past us

Once the herd does these three things calmly and consistently, we'll have a great start on developing real control.

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