ranching

Post #2 by Seth Itzkan from Dimbangombe, Zimbabwe

Part 2: Hut With A View - Community Visits - 9/13/11

I don't even know how to start. The words that come to mind are hot, dust, sand, water, bare ground, struggle, promise, thirst, water (again), team work, manure, lions, fire, driving, children, bye bye, hello, and "What is the weather like in America"?.

Matching feed availability to cattle needs: a paradigm shift at the Broughton Land Company

Changing the calving season to better match the availability of pasture with the nutritional needs of the herd has resulted in cutting winter feed costs by half and being able to sell 14,000 more pounds of calves last year at the Broughton Land Company's ranch near Dayton, Washington.

Burrows Stewardship Day 2002

Summary: A day of presentations and workshops, hosted yearly since 1987 at Burrows Ranch in Red Bluff, California, U.S.A. This year's topics included:

Revegetating a stream in northern California

Frank & Vicky Dawley
bare streamside
1980. Under conventional management, bare banks eroded during winter floods.


Frank & Vicky Dawley

Happenings around the region, Sept 1997

Joel Herrmann
Joel Herrmann in his camp in Owhyhee County, Idaho, USA.

The big news is that people are examining their thought processes and beliefs, and changing the way they make decisions. The following represents a small fraction of what is going on in the Northwest when people set out to manage wholes rather than parts. It's just the tip of the iceberg.

Oregon Country Beef: growing a solution to economic, environmental, and social needs

[this interview was published in 2000. Since then, the cooperative has expanded beyond Oregon, reverted to its original name of Country Natural Beef, and includes well over 100 ranchers in the western states.]

Older posts

News and links from April 2001 to April 2002

Understanding dryland salinity

An article by Christine Jones:

Establishing perennial grasses in dryland areas

Summary: In a dry summer climate like northern California's, perennial grasses grow far more forage than annuals, but are hard to establish. Here's one way to do it.

Wilma Keppel
green field, browning hills

Profiles of good stewardship

Articles

Integrating ranchland ownership with community values

Discovering a new way of owning land that will adequately capitalize working ranches, increase the liquidity of human investment, and maintain whole, healthy landscapes

Executive Summary

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